Meet Neurologist Brian MacFalda, D.O., Stroke Program Director, MidMichigan Health

Meet Neurologist Brian MacFalda, D.O., Stroke Program Director, MidMichigan Health


Hi my name is Dr. Brian MacFalda, and I’m a neurologist at MidMichigan Health. As the system stroke director for all of
MidMichigan’s Medical Centers, I work collaboratively with the stroke team and
accrediting stroke agencies as well as Michigan Medicine to ensure excellent
care and better outcomes. My goal is to improve the overall quality of
healthcare the patient receives by implementing a consistent standard of
stroke care across the health system. By doing this, my hope is to reduce the
length of stay and get patients on the road to recovery more quickly and reduce
the overall cost in the process. In addition to being the system stroke
director, I also see patients in the clinic. My philosophy of patient care is
one in which I like to partner with the patients. I don’t like to tell them what
to do, but I do like to educate them on the disease process to help them better
decide what the best plan of care is for them. I may help steer them or direct
them if I feel a decision is not in their best interest, but I always want
them to understand that they do have options. In addition to special interests
in sports neurology, concussions and stroke, I have specialized training in
the treatment of epilepsy. I find treating epilepsy to be fascinating. If we get someone with
epilepsy on the right treatment plan, we can give them back their independence. I
see patients with epilepsy at their most vulnerable. These treatments allow
them to be better controlled and more independent with things like driving or
holding down a job — things that most of us take for granted. There are surgical
interventions for the treatment of epilepsy as well and for those who are
good candidates, we typically see an 80 percent curative rate. This is one of the few
neurologic disease processes that can be curative. I really enjoy what I do,
because the brain is the body’s most important organ.
It’s the last and final frontier of medicine, and we are quickly finding out
things we could only once dream about. And hopefully we will soon have better
treatments or cures for neurologic diseases that we once thought impossible.

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