Follow the pain meditation

Follow the pain meditation


Hi, this is Richard from Psych Reviews. Here’s just a quick tip on how to follow pain in order to improve your meditation and concentration. With meditation we want to see unnecessary pain, or dissatisfaction, which is one of the three characteristics in Buddhism. The concentration serves the purpose of catching what you’re doing. Much of the pain comes from the time dimension and clinging to preferences related to the past or the future. We can see this in our work, for example. There’s a sense of hurry, rushing and forcing that you can feel start up right in your skull. Yet when we finish work, you can catch the mind relaxing, like letting go of a mental burden. When you feel that you can try to maintain
that relief. For example, if you are on a break, try to
maintain that letting go feeling that naturally happens just when you are starting your break, and keep thinking and talking like normal. Like in the Improve your Concentration video, automatic impulses will come up, out of your control, so keep welcoming them and waiting for them to subside on their own. Tensions they tend to peak and then pass away because they’re impermanent. Pain is happening all the time and some of it can’t be avoided, but some of it is just your particular habit. If thoughts are painful, we have to kind of
assess with our concentration whether they need to be followed or not. At some point after years of practice, the
mind learns to savour being normal and finds a balance between necessary mental processing and pain, and relief. You can feel the mental movements prefer to hurt oneself less when it’s starting to learn. If we are going to feel lots of pain on this
planet we might as well avoid the pain we can avoid, then our personality can turn into more like a sensing person where you enjoy dwelling in the moment, instead of ruminating about possibilities. Of course this doesn’t replace changing your environment, removing toxic people from your environment would be step 1, but even if you can’t you can still relax as much optional stress as you can, until you get the opportunity to change your environment and make it better. We can focus on the movement of the attention span in particular. Target not just welcoming in your body, but also the intention to pay attention. Your attention span is moving and each movement is an intention. A lot of those movements have little sharp suppressions and we can start relaxing it at that level, and even if you feel a little
bit bored, because you actually are very relaxed, you can always increase the energy by taking in deeper breaths and continuing to maintain that relaxation where possible. Eventually as you get more advanced, you can allow emotions fully because they hurt very much, now that you are not adding sharp suppressions to your attention span. You become more authentic and avoid all those character disorders that we talk about, where you have a false self all the time. Even if you need to have a false self for
work or social events, you can learn to allow emotions in a skillful way so that you are
authentic and pro-social. The goal how I see it, in fact like that movie Tree of Life, I just watched the extended version, there’s one great scene where the
kid notices a three-legged dog playing and how it isn’t bothered by having only three
legs. That’s sort of what we’re trying to do with
meditation. Everyday has many little small leg removals, and we have to let go of them so that we can get on with our lives.

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