Child and Youth Mental Health Service and the ‘Got It!’ program

Child and Youth Mental Health Service and the ‘Got It!’ program


My name’s Lucy Rosnell and I’m a
psychologist. I work for the Nepean Blue Mountains Child and Youth Mental Health Service and some people refer to our service as “CYMHS”. We’re at the Child and
Youth Mental Health building which is on High Street in Penrith, so here we’ve
got five consultation rooms that are all decorated with different themes in mind. The reason we do that is because we want this space to be a really welcoming and inviting space for
young people that we work with. We’ve got toys, we’ve got doll houses it’s just to make the children that
come here feel more at home and more at ease and, you know, that this is a
really safe place that you can come and talk with us. One of the teams in CYMHS is the “Got It!” team “Got It!” is the team that I work for
but there’s a whole lot of other teams that work with, you know, different needs
of individual children and with different ages and things like that
within our service. So my team in particular, we work mostly in schools so what it looks like is we run group interventions working with parents and with kids normally in a classroom. Our intervention’s based on an evidence-based approach called “exploring together” so what we do is we we work on developing children’s emotional intelligence parents ability to manage sometimes really difficult behaviour in their children we are about
promoting resilience and looking for strength within the community and within
the family so a lot of the work that we do is around building strengths within that relationship between parent and child and that’s where the big shifts
change, and what we know from research is that having a really strong and
secure attachment in childhood with a carer or with a parent or some
significant person that can provide that safety in a relationship actually, you know, is one of the greatest predictors of a healthy, adaptive, happy adult so that’s probably where the key to our
intervention lies I’d say.

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